PACHI rolls out bwalo forums towards Cholera preparedness and awareness

Cholera repeated occurrence is a threat to Malawi. The incidents are often linked to floods which keeps re-occurring in Lilongwe or drought. The consequences includes; death, severe illness which helps in the increase of burden on health services and worsening hygiene.

Although there has been an improvement in water and sanitation in the country cholera still remains endemic. Its persistence is linked with lack of safe drinking water, hygiene practices and sanitation among others.

For this reason PACHI in collaboration with UNICEF have joined hands in giving local citizens of mtandile,mtsiliza,area 36,mitengo and kauma a platform called bwalo to voice out issues that are contributing to the rise of cholera cases in their communities and also make duty bearers feel accountable and responsible for cholera prevention and response. This in return will help build understanding in the need to improved health care, hygiene practices.

Speaking during an interview project coordinator Laura Munthali said the platform will help to motivate local citizens and encourage participation, involvement as well as build community capacity in identifying and addressing community needs. She also added that the forums will also motivate local citizens to advocate for policy changes to respond better their health needs.

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Bwalo session in progress

In one of the Bwalo formation forum with the community leaders, senior chief Kauma commended PACHI for the initiative, he said these forums will help in removing barriers between the local citizens and the duty bearers which in turn will help to bring developments in his community that will help to end frequent cholera outbreaks.

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Senior Chief Kauma

PACHI is implementing the social accountability project on Cholera preparedness and awareness with support from UNICEF with the aim of improving water, sanitation and hygiene activities in the areas that were mostly affected by cholera in Lilongwe.